Knowledge Isn’t All Powerful (4/6)

 

This post is the 4th in a 6-part series on Idolizing Knowledge. Read the rest of the posts here. Guest directory info is available here.

Sitting down to play a board game is relaxing. Until it isn’t.

One game in particular gets my wheels spinning with a frustration that is probably healthy for me.

It’s called 7 Wonders. Each turn, every player selects a card from their hand and then passes the rest to their neighbor. Around and around the hands go, whittling down with each turn. Inevitably, I realize I’ve got two cards in a hand that will allow my neighbor to win. I can only take one card though.

Come the passing of the hands, my neighbor wins. And I knew they would. But I couldn’t do a thing about it.


We can know all about something and have no power to change it or act on it.

The anthem “knowledge is power” gets us on our feet until we’re on our knees, fully informed about something we can’t change. Whether we learn all about a loved ones’ diagnosis or gain insight into someone else’s success, knowledge does not always equate to power.

Forgetting this fact is one of the most frustrating things for wanna-know-it-alls like me.

I think of the prophets.

Even with visions of what was to come and warnings given by God, they had no power to change the course of the people.

God even told Ezekiel that as a watchman Ezekiel was not responsible for the people’s responses to the prophecies. He was merely responsible for speaking the truth. There was no sugarcoating. Ezekiel was to speak knowing the people would not listen and destruction would surely still come.

Ezekiel remarked:

“They have seen false visions and lying divinations. They say, ‘Declares the Lord,’ when the Lord has not sent them, and yet they expect him to fulfill their word.” –Ezekiel 13:6

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We’re like that. We treat the knowledge we have like it’s the God-given truth and as if we’ve divined how to apply it properly. Using our knowledge, we proclaim how things are going to be. Then, we get mad when God doesn’t backup our plans with the power to see them through.

The gap between our knowledge and our power is where surrender lives. <Tweet this>

God is all-knowing and all-powerful. There’s nothing He doesn’t know about and nothing He can’t do something about.

That’s why we end up on our knees, fully informed and full incapable. We know the One who is capable, and we pray He exerts His power in a way that fits our knowledge.

However, God’s all-knowingness exceeds the information we have. We know the type of cancer, the odds, the way it affects the body. He knows all that too- and He knows how it fits into His perfect plan. God knows how to make good out of what’s not good. He can do it and He will.

Since His knowledge exceeds ours and He is good, we have reason to trust that whatever power He exerts, what He knows and what He does will align for our good and His glory.

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Surrendering to the One who is in control should be relieving.

If we’re honest about the limits of human knowledge, we realize it is good we aren’t in control. We don’t have the know-how to wield sovereignty well. And when we think we do, we can end up:

  • Growing egotistical and distant from God
  • Having “our own understanding” define our path
  • Leading others astray because our knowledge is limited
  • Unprepared to face the truth
  • Getting way ahead of ourselves and the Lord’s plans

Laying down what we know before the One who knows what to do protects us. Especially from messes like these. My husband points out, “What we don’t know we can’t control.” Whew.

Surrender in the space between knowledge and power relieves the tension that wears us and tears us as we live out the limits of being human.


Do you need to take knowledge off the pedestal of power to lay what you know at His feet?

Join me for the next 5 weeks to delve deeper into shattering the idol of knowledge to take hold of knowledge as God intends it to be.

This post may also be shared on: #MomentsofHope, #DreamTogetherLinkup, #TestimonyTuesday, #RaRaLinkup, #TellHisStory, #Thought-Provoking Thursday, #Heart Ecnouragement, #LiveFreeThursday, #DanceWithJesus, #LLMLinkup, Faith-Filled Friday, Sitting Among Friends, and #SoulSurvivalLinkup.

I would love to have you guest post on First and Second. Submissions for a guest directory on Idolizing Knowledge are due March 15th! More info on guest posting here.

Letting “It” Be

Photo from: weheartit.com

Moving from a place of resignation to the holy space of accepting God’s sovereignty joyfully and humbly isn’t easy.

One of the benefits of resignation is that we get to give up responsibility and keep complaining anyway. We get to say “it is what is” and then harbor bitterness and doubt. That’s easier than facing hope and change, which come with risk and a lack of control.

But for those of us who end their resignation, the risk proves worthwhile. When we choose to accept God’s reality we are indeed humbled –but also overjoyed. We can, without bitterness or doubt, let “it” be (whatever “it” is.)

Surrender isn’t just “I’m done fighting.” Surrender is saying “Have your way.” (tweet this).

It’s a form of losing. Letting it be, surrendering, means giving up. But for the believer, it’s also the greatest gain. To let it be, we have to leave “it” elsewhere. To give it up, we have to give “it” to someone.

Instead of making what we’ve surrendered to as a master, we surrender it to our master.

No longer our own, “it” is in the hands of the same One we belong too. “It” is no longer ours to be bitter about or complain over. Rather, the “it” that’s been weighing us down and keeping us stuck is turned into a sacrifice of praise.

When we surrender to Christ, we do more than resign ourselves to failure –we give ourselves to His victory. As James 4:10 proclaims:

Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up.”

This post is being shared on: #Thought-Provoking Thursday #Faith-Filled Friday, #DanceWithJesus, and #LifeGivingLinkup.

Love The Lord

Photo from: www.playbuzz.com

What does it mean to love the one who defines love?

Love was in the mind of the one who thought up and foreknew all that is. His voice boomed with love when He spoke all into being.

From the first sin of man to the day His perfect (all-loving!) son was rejected and crucified, even separated from God, love was at work. Even after that, after He was denied, abandoned, and all that He said that no man could have possibly known came true, His return was filled up and overflowing with love.

He showed His love for us by dying in our stead and rising again, even while we were His enemies.

Before and after that, the Lord’s love has also:

Been patient. Bearing with us through endless sinning and rejection and idolatry and selfishness (see: the entire Old Testament!)

Been kind. Giving every good gift, blessing us with His presence, peace, and an ability to live a righteous life.

Not envied, not boasted, not been proud, with the Lord Lording over us His perfection and power. Even when He has been jealous for us, He has done nothing to force us back to Him.

Has not dishonored anyone or been self-seeking. Has not been easily angered. He keeps no record of wrongs– offering for free to wipe all record of our sin and look on the sacrificial lamb of Christ instead!

His Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. So much so that all that is hidden, all we feel ashamed of, He redeems.

God’s love always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. HIS Love never fails.

Familiar? That’s 1 Corinthians 13. That’s the example God has given us of what it is to love.

And He says to us in Matthew 22:

“‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’
This is the first and greatest commandment.”

His commandments are not impossible. Spoken and given in perfect love, the commands encompasses all others. It is as kind, patient, and compassionate as the command a parent gives their child to stay out of the road or to eat their meal. When we obey this loving command to love, we thrive. We follow God’s way –the best way.

God’s whole person is bound up in that greatest commandment –that greatest way of being. And isn’t that what all our heart, mind, and soul mean? That our whole being is to be like His by being composed wholly of love?

Think about that: to love God, we have to follow His example. Because His example is love and there is no love apart from the love He creates, defines, and exemplifies. So by loving like God loves, we love God. His love is the standard set, even for loving Him.

If you want to love God, turn your thoughts to the thoughts He has taught us. Turn your mind to the mind of Christ. Shift your heart to align with His. No greater joy is found, no greater love given or received, than to wholly give up oneself to be His.

This post is being shared on: #LifeGivingLinkup #TestimonyTuesday, #RaRaLinkup, #Intentionally Pursuing, #WomenWithIntention, and #TellHiStory.