6. BEHOLD: Our Home

After holiday festivities, you just want to get home. People traveling far and wide for Christmas celebrations know the nostalgia of wanting to get to their own place –or even just the familiar, beloved place they are headed.

When Jesus was born, it wasn’t in His own place. But He still had a place to be. And the welcome was grand!

“Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.”

Romans 15:7

Regardless of our physical location and setting, we have a place to be too. We all have a home. Over and over in Scripture we read about God as our place of refuge. God is our dwelling place. He makes a safe pasture for us.

Because of Christ, we even have access into the most Holy Place. More than that, we are welcomed there:

“Therefore, brothers and sisters, since we have confidence to enter the Most Holy Place by the blood of Jesus,”

Hebrews 10:19

The Lord ensures that we all have a home. It may not be in this world, and it may not be a place in a physical sense at all. But just as “home” is found where loved ones are and the heart is full, so home is the place of being near the Lord. He loves to have us there.

As we bustle about and rush to get places –even our own places- may we behold the home we have in the Lord!

Behold, the one who always welcomes us with open arms.

Behold, the safest, most loving, perfect home we can have and hope for.

Behold, our place with the Lord that we eagerly run to regardless of where we are.

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5. BEHOLD: Our Beholder

It’s easy to get too busy during the Christmas season. Many of us have a ton to do, people to see, plans to complete, and the deadline of each celebration to face. In the midst of the busy, it’s just as easy to peel our eyes from Christ to gaze instead at our many lists and calendars.

For many of us, there is no effort involved in removing Jesus from Christmas. We are not consciously trying to discard the reason for the season. Our gaze simply isn’t fixed on Him because we’ve got so much else we’re looking at.

Ironic, right? While celebrating Christ, we struggle to do what would seem most natural at this time:

“fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of our faith”

Hebrews 12:2

Though we decorate to honor His birth and sing carols to remember and praise His arrival, we’re often too busy beholding the wonders of beautiful traditions and earthly joy to gaze in awe at our Lord.

Yet He is never too busy, distracted, or caught up. Our Lord, whether we gaze back or not, has fixed His eyes upon us.

“The eyes of the LORD are on the righteous”

–Psalm 34:15

“I will counsel you with my loving eye on you.”

Psalm 32:8

The pioneer, author, and perfecter of our faith delights in beholding us. Our creator, our heavenly Father, has fixed His eyes on each of us –just as the sparrow.  He can behold us with awe and wonder because His work in us, often in spite of us, is awesome and wonderful.

Imagine –in our carol-singing, house-decorating, card-exchanging, and stressed-preparing moments, He is beholding us in love. From those same places, we can gaze back at Him.

Behold, the one who beholds us.

Behold, the one whose eyes we can meet because Christ has made it so.

Behold, the perspective of the perfect One.

“God saw all that he had made, and it was very good.”

Genesis 1:31

What Your Broken Heart is Worth

Photo from: Pixabay

I’ll admit, this idea hit me when I misheard the lyrics to “First” by Lauren Daigle. I thought she was singing: “before I bring my need I will break my heart.” The line didn’t quite make sense, but I was convinced that’s what she was singing, and then I read this verse:

“My sacrifice, O God, is a broken spirit;
a broken and contrite heart
you, God, will not despise.”
Psalm 51:17

Could it be that the Lord values our brokenness? That a worthy sacrifice in His eyes is our hearts –broken? It sounds sinister, but we know our Lord is good.

It follows then, that the Lord’s desire for our broken hearts is the same as the Lord’s desire for our good. A broken heart can be a blessing. A broken heart can glorify God.

Earlier, in Psalm 51:10, we read the much loved line:

Create in me a pure heart, O God,
and renew a steadfast spirit within me.”

Could it be that this heart is one in the same at times?

David exemplified this as he wrote this Psalm. It was written when David was confronted about his adultery with Bathsheba. Convicted and mourning his sinfulness and its consequences (like his son’s resulting death,) David chose not to turn from God. He chose not to mend his grief with proof that he could be worthy again if he tried.

Instead, David offered the Lord his broken heart. It was through that sacrifice that David’s heart was made clean again and that His joy was returned. Through that sacrifice and brokenness, David was given a willing spirit again and could experience and witness the Lord’s true forgiveness.

When our hearts are broken, something is exposed and made vulnerable. What’s inside the heart (though formerly fortified) becomes available for change, healing, and growth. In fact, the healing work of redemption is nothing without there first being a need for the healing and the redemption.

When we break open our hearts (or have them broken and hand them to the Lord,) it is a sacrifice on our part. It’s a sacrifice of dignity, of a sense of control, and of our pride. To sacrifice our broken hearts to the Lord is to say: “I won’t try to fix this my way, but I will it to you for your glory and your glorious work.”

It is praise to the Lord to offer Him our broken hearts as sacrifices, because we’re offering for Him to freely correct, clean, and rebuild us as He pleases, to His glory. It is a putting aside of all the gunk we have in our hearts to return our hearts to their maker. When your heart is breaking, let it be a blessing and a praise.

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